The Tweeting Shebeen

“There was a time a few months ago I dismissed Twitter as being a total waste of time, a place where sad geeks tweeted about anything and everything they did. Now I realise that people from all walks of life are connecting via Twitter in meaningful ways. I thought why not see if writers and poets and those with an interest in writing can connect on Twitter too?”
Poet and blogger David Todd < www.google.com/profiles/davetodd7> puts his finger on it. Social Media is useful if you have a reason to use it. Some who first look at Twitter see a long list of often short, unconnected and inconsequential messages amounting to no more than:

  • The cat just sneezed
  • The cat just sneezed again
  • The cat hasn’t sneezed for 10 minutes, now.

Others see an apparent lack of structure which puts them off, particularly when on their first few visits they don’t know any or many of the people who are posting. David started a group for writers through Tweetworks < www.tweetworks.com > a system which can help put a structure in place by arranging the posts.

“With the creation of the group Writers' Shebeen
< www.tweetworks.com/groups/view/WritersShebeen > it means there's a place where writers on Twitter can connect and they don't waste valuable writing time.” He told me. “Also, there are so many talented writers and poets in Northern Ireland that don't have the time or desire to join established creative writing groups and could join or just read tweets at Writers' Shebeen group and hopefully read a tweet that might encourage or inspire them to write.”

Northern Irish authors and publishers have realised that the Internet is a very important marketing tool; this group can be one of the tools used to help sell books. “I've seen tweets by authors read by thousands of people re-tweeted and the message they've sent reaches millions of people in a few minutes.”

Writers' Shebeen started with a few people but is growing. David is hoping real life connections will be made between writers. “Maybe these connections could result in workshops, poetry slams, readings and book launches being arranged or people just meeting [a tweet up] over a coffee or a pint for a chat about writing.”

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