Google Buzz or Google Zzzz?

Although my next Belfast Telegraph Twitter column won’t be published until 2 March, I’ll be writing it on Sunday next (21 February).

I’ll be writing about Google Buzz and I’m interested in your thoughts are to quote in the piece.

Tell me here or on Twitter @davy_sims.

Thanks

7 thoughts on “Google Buzz or Google Zzzz?

  • It has elements that work very well, however from the outset it just looks like another place to dump information that no one will ever look at, much like friend feed.

    The problem with setting up or getting into ‘another’ social networking site, is finding your friends that you regularly converse with on other platforms. Sure google have made this slightly handier with your gmail contacts being already in the following list however facebook and twitter go way beyond that, how am I supposed to find them ? ask them for an email address ? did emails not go out with the fax machine ?

  • The launch of Google Buzz has been, well, poor. It seems like Google have taken their eye off the ball in a big way. Privacy concerns have been a major, major talking point in regards to Facebook but within the first few days of launch the tech community have been pointing out things such as the automatic integration with Gmail, private email addresses being revealed in replies etc. Yes, Google have tackled some of the issues but it’s been a bit of a PR disaster.

    There are plenty of reasons why some of us never use the web interface for Gmail, and Buzz is an example of just one of those.

  • By embedding it into Gmail it has the userbase – and also not, in that it isn’t as “messy” as some might say facebook or twitter have become.

    But then again, many people are comfortable with fb & twitter and find no need for another. There are issues of privacy in how it automatically connects users with those who they have emailed – this has now been rectified, and now only ‘suggestions’ users to follow.

    Then there is how it links with Google Reader – Some, like the blogger in the Guardian article above find this intrusive, as people who have not been specifically invited to view shared Reader items now can, but then it is quite clear that this has occured – though it should be stated more clearly.

    For me, I find this an advantage – I now have more people who’s shared Reader items I am following, and vice versa – I don’t share too many articles myself, though find it useful to read the shared items of friends/those I am interested in.

    For now, my final point is that, like so many of Google’s products, Buzz is not integrated into Google Apps, which I use rather than my old Gmail address. There is a mobile version available which I have been using, and by going to their google profile (or checking my friends list of followees and followers) I have been able to follow people.

    There isn’t much difference between this service and FriendFeed – and like Wave, it seems to have been released a little earlier than it should have been in order to iron out its numerous flaws.

    (how many words has your column to be?)

  • Thanks to everyone for the replies. The piece isn’t quite written, but I want to keep quotations as intact as possible (only 400 words, Phil) so I’ll be using these and a few Twitter (and only one Buzz) message.

  • By the way – here are the Twitter posts:

    @jmcaliskey Do we need another social network? All the other ones integrate perfectly well. What’s it’s USP?

    @_d_a_v_e_ Thanks for the reminder to check mine. Definitely ZZzzzzzzzzzzzzzz

    @webireland Google zzz in my opinion. Half hearted attempt using Gmail user base for leverage.

    @webireland Privacy concerns associating it so closely with the email interface as well IMO, definitely has scope for a “whoopsie” moment

    @iChrisTaylor buzz allows more user interaction, better development of conversations. Don’t think it’ll replace FB just yet.

    @iChrisTaylor also it’s in your email +’s and -‘s but gmail users are more likely to check it.

    And through Buzz James Scott: Simplicity is the key. With Twitter you know exactly what your getting – it’s simple and does what it says on the tin. That’s why it captured the imagination of millions of users. What’s the killer feature of Buzz to draw in the masses?

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