Almost two years ago, I set out on an imaginary journey around the Mediterranean to explore the music and hear how such diverse cultures and peoples could influence each other and rely on each other for development in modern music. 

The Question

The question for each country and region was “Who is the Horslips of this place?” Or who is the Fairport Convention and later “Who is the Mostar Sevdah Reunion?” In other words, who has taken traditional(ish) music and given it a modern interpretation. Not everywhere has a Horslips and when I got to the middle-east and north Africa, the question became redundant.

I was tired of music. Tired of hearing variations of the same old thing. I also missed my days as a DJ who went in search of the new and interesting to share with listeners.

Still Adding Touches

Discovering music is not a linear thing. Just because you have moved (and sometimes directly because you have moved) from one place to another, does not mean that you won’t find something you missed earlier. Consequently, these playlists are not permanent. I will find other good music and add it. I (already have) will remove music which on third or fourth listening I don’t like. This whole thing is purely subjective.

Last first or first last?

Because blogs work as they do (most recent post at the top) the last country visited, Morocco, will look like the start rather than the end. But this is the start: Exploring the music of the Mediterranean (introduction) – 

Then we travel to these regions and countries. 

Gibraltar – Andalusia (or Andalucía) – Murcia – Valencia – Catalonia –  France Monaco – Italy’s North West – Western Italy – Italy – Toe to heel – Slovenia Croatia – Bosnia and Herzegovina – Montenegro – AlbaniaGreece – TurkeySyriaLebanonIsraelPalestineEgyptLibyaTunisiaAlgeriaMorocco

The Future

I will be tidying the posts and over the next year or so and I will be launching a few spinouts. When I’m ready I will decide where to go next; north or east. West is the Americas and south is Africa, both well travelled by people tracking the music. Yet parts of Europe are not and the east will always be a place of fascination, especially as contemporary music becomes easier to find, record and distribute.